Sunday, January 27, 2013

Thieves & Oath Breakers


Zechariah 5:1-4
1 I looked again--and there before me was a flying scroll! 2 He asked me, "What do you see?" I answered, "I see a flying scroll, thirty feet long and fifteen feet wide.” 3 And he said to me, "This is the curse that is going out over the whole land; for according to what it says on one side, every thief will be banished, and according to what it says on the other, everyone who swears falsely will be banished. 4 The LORD Almighty declares, 'I will send it out, and it will enter the house of the thief and the house of him who swears falsely by my name. It will remain in his house and destroy it, both its timbers and its stones.' " NIV 
Every thief will be banished
Those that have stolen will pay the price for their thievery:
·         Elections to public office.
·         Misuse of public funds and taxes.
·         Malfeasance in office
Everyone who swears falsely will be banished
Constitution, Article 6 - Debts, Supremacy, Oaths 
The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.
The President of the United States swore to:
… faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States."
The Constitution is quite clear on one aspect of the oath: "no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States." And yet every oath except the Presidential one -- which is explicitly detailed in the Constitution -- now ends with "So help me God." 
The Constitution specifies an oath of office only for the President:
US Constitution, Article II, Section 1 
"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States."
The Vice President of the United States swore to:
… support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.
The Vice President takes the oath of office in the same ceremony as the President. Until 1933, the Vice President took the oath in the Senate. The vice president's oath dates from 1884 and is the same as that taken by Congressmen:
I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.
Every member of Congress (both Senate and House of Representatives swore to:
…support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.
At the start of each new Congress, the entire House of Representatives and one-third of the Senate are sworn into office. This oath-taking dates to 1789, the first Congress; however, the current oath was fashioned in the 1860s, by Civil War-era members of Congress. 
The Constitution specifies no details for the oath of office for Congress.
Constitution, Article 6 - Debts, Supremacy, Oaths 
The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.
The first Congress developed this requirement into a simple, 14-word oath:
"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States."
The Civil War led President Lincoln to develop an expanded oath for all federal civilian employees (April 1861). That July, when Congress reconvened, "members echoed the president's action by enacting legislation requiring employees to take the expanded oath in support of the Union. This oath is the earliest direct predecessor of the modern oath."
The current oath was enacted in 1884:
I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.
The public swearing-in ceremony consists of Representatives raising their right hands and repeating the oath of office. This ceremony is led by the Speaker of the House, and no religious texts are used. Some members of Congress later hold separate private ceremonies for photo ops. 
Every member of the Supreme Court swore to:
… administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as [TITLE] under the Constitution and laws of the United States. So help me God."
The Constitution specifies no details for the oath of office for the Supreme Court:
Title 28, Chapter I, Part 453 of the United States Code
According to Title 28, Chapter I, Part 453 of the United States Code, each Supreme Court Justice takes the following oath:
"I, [NAME], do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as [TITLE] under the Constitution and laws of the United States. So help me God."
Every military officer swore to:
… support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God."
DA Form 71, 1 August 1959, for Army officers
The full wording of the current oath for commissioned officers is as follows:
"I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the Army of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God." 
Every military enlistee swore to:
… support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God."
Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 with amendment effective 5 October 1962
The full wording of the current oath of enlistment is as follows:
"I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God."
Every State legislator swore to:
… support [the] Constitution [of the United States].
Constitution, Article 6 - Debts, Supremacy, Oaths 
The … Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers … of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.
There is no room
There never has truly been and certainly there is no longer any room for:
·         America to dodge the bullet of God’s curse without sincere repentance and return to a genuine place of salvation and worship of the Lord Almighty.
·         Public officials to ignore their oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America.
·         Attempts to subvert the Constitution by ignoring it’s clear provisions for free speech, right to bear arms, freedom and liberty governed by the rule of law.
As a nation begun on the principals of God’s Holy Word, we do not have the privilege of ignoring God’s warnings. God will not be mocked!
Scripture pronounces consequences for oath-keeping failure
Scripture pronounces dire consequences for failure to keep one’s oaths sworn in the name of God.
The Lord says, 'I will send it out, and it will enter the house of the thief and the house of him who swears falsely by my name. It will remain in his house and destroy it, both its timbers and its stones (Zechariah 4:4 NIV).
Can America be under such a curse today, because of the rampant failure of sworn public servants to keep their oaths of office? Rabbi Jonathan Khan suggested that this may be so in his speech before the 2013 Presidential Inaugural Prayer Breakfast. This video is worth your time to watch and share. 2013 Presidential Inaugural Prayer Breakfast
Khan calls prophetically for America to repent in accordance with 2 Chronicles 7:14!

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